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Dirty Tricks in Web Advertising

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: JavaScript, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Dirty Tricks in Web Advertising

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperContrary to what most people believe, web advertising is in its infancy. Many companies are still trying to figure out what works, and what doesn't. Their experiments are understandable, they are trying to figure out an audience that spans all known geographic, ethnic, social, economic, racial, religious, ideological, and moral boundaries, phew! That was a mouthful. There are still even newer marketing demographics and sub-demographics being created while they are trying to figure out how to target the old ones. How on Earth is a marketing / web development studio supposed to get a grip on all of it. The answer is elusive, but first I will say what won't get the job done, then we'll explore some ways to get it done.

The way advertisers won't get a grip on web niches is by utilizing dirty tricks in advertising. This includes, but is not limited to, pop-ups, pop-unders, javascript pop-ups, unwanted javascript redirections, flash pop-ups, spam email, and tacky, poorly designed banner ads. Let's look at these one at a time. There has never been a time in the history of the internet where unsolicited pop-up advertisements have been a good thing. As indicated above, this was forgivable because the internet was new, and this was a new way to reach people. Once, however, people began to hate this method of advertising, and demonstrate it by installing software to prevent pop-ups it should have stopped, right. Wrong, instead web marketers began to circuimvent users' defences and use pop-under ads, or advertisements that would come up and hide behind your top browser window, waiting until you closed your browser. Great idea right?!!? Wrong, that is like letting that one advertising exec with the awful ideas in the office get a shot at a limted run of ads. For example, he comes up with A new cola bottle with an overweight child pouring a bag of sugar with the cola label into his mouth, with a moniker reading cola making a big America even bigger. This runs in limited fashion despite the passionate pleas of every focus group it is exposed to. Cola sees a radical drop in its sales numbers, but instead promotes this guy to creative director, thereby putting the ads on billboard all over the country. Eventually Cola goes out of business, a smouldering ruin of its former greatness.

That should never happen in real life. That is the absurdity of trying to irritate users into adopting your product, it just doesn't make sense, and will end up making a company bankrupt. But it didn't stop there, the anti-pop up software got smarter, and was better able to block pop-under, and javascript pop-up windows. Now, there are always going to be an element of shadyness associated with some companies. That is as true in reality as it is on the web, hence unwanted redirections. But there were and are legitimate companies that have used, and are still using these tactics. Surely by now these companies have gotten the message that users don't want a bunch of pop-ups littering their desktops; and they have. The problem now is that in an effort to be less invasive, they have adopted CSS and Flash pop-ups. Talk about dense! People don't want to wait to get to their content. These are barriers, just like splash pages. People will click away.

Spam email is probably the most reviled thing the internet has ever produced, however companies continue to do it, and they put their (click here to remove yourelf from our list) in like 6pt. font at the bottom of their email surrounded by disclaimer information. Most users at this point aren't even looking at the garbage that comes across in their email. They either delete it immediately, or they look at the ad, remember the vendor so that they can never ever buy anything from them again.

Tacky banner ads are the least of the evils described in this article, but they can be just as distracting as pop-ups. Flashing, excessively moving or audible banner ads are no-nos. If you want people to be able to view your website at work without their bosses going nuts, you should make it look professional so that it blends in with the rest of their applications. Not draw attention to it so that they get a repromand for spending too much time on the net.

So, now that we have explored how not to advertise on the net, let's see how to advertise. When I go to Froogle