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Internet Explorer 7 Won’t Make the Grade on Acid

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: JavaScript, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Internet Explorer 7 Won't Make the Grade on Acid

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperAs the market leader and pace-setter as far as which technologies make the cut for the web Microsoft has a responsiblity to create the most standards compliant browser possible, even at the risk of breaking legacy sites built specifically for IE. Microsoft has always wanted developers to use it's unusual flavor of IE. Whether it is by building extra padding into block level elements regardless of how the css padding attribute is used, or allowing oddities like allowing the use of the color attribute on TR table elements, developers have always had to consider the quirks of IE when building anything for deployment over the web.

I'm sure that IE 7 will be much improved over IE 6 as far as standards compliance is concerned, and some of those oddities I truly enjoy, like being able to give a TR an ID attribute and specifying a header style for my tables in a stylesheet, but at the same time, if we don't have web standards we'll devolve into fragmented development languages like it was 1995 all over again. IE 6 actually had excellent standards compliance when it came out, but times have changed and there are some advanced features like page-break-after that I'd love to use more widely. Part of the reason I love to build intranet applications for Mac only shops is that I know they will be using Safari 2.0 which is an excellent browser based on the open source Konqueror browser bundled with many Linux distros. It supports most if not all CSS 2 tags, and should pass the Acid2 test with ease. Also, by developing to XHTML 1.0 Strict I know that my site will degrade gracefully on everything from mobile devices to old 3.0 browsers. Using ECMAScript also keeps most backward compatability and allows developers to create reliable JavaScripts that will work across all compliant browsers in the same fashion.

I agree with Hakon Lie that Microsoft should really take more time and make sure they nail this one, not just for right now, but for the future since we all know they won't release another web browser perhaps forever since they are convinced that Avalon will change the face of web applications and render the web browser superfluous. We've heard that one before, remember Active X? I hope that everyone calls on Microsoft to work to get IE 7 to pass the Acid2 test, not just so that it will support some bizarre standard that is going to make all our lives harder, but so that developers can be sure that applications they develop today will still look and work the same five years from now. C'mon Microsoft please?

Next Explorer to fail Acid Test – CNET