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MySpace.com Switches From ColdFusion to Blue Dragon

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: ColdFusion, Microsoft, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | 1 Comment »

MySpace.com Switches From ColdFusion to Blue Dragon

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperWhen MySpace decided to stop using ColdFusion recently, many ColdFusion developers felt somewhat betrayed by the change. Many even suggested that it wasn't the best engineered solution. By that they were hinting that by using fusebox, no one has said which version, and ColdFusion 4.5 / 5 they weren't working with the best that Macromedia had to offer.

New Atlanta claims in their press release that using the exact same code, MySpace was able to reduce their CPU usage by 50% under heavy load. They also claim that this result could not be duplicated with ColdFusion MX. I believe both of these claims. Most ColdFusion developers are loathe to admit it, but Microsoft has a pretty good thing going with C# right now. The ASP.net framework is decent, it performs extremely well in every test I have seen, so I am not suprised that by using ADO.net and ASP.net they were seeing gains like this. The biggest problem with any scripting or programming language comes down to the drivers when using an external resource. Web development is no different. When your database connection pool reaches it's limit, it just can't create any more connections and requests get queued. There is no way around this except to get better database drivers. I have seen JDBC fail miserably time and time again, especially with SQL Server 2000 in this area. One of the biggest causes of that 100% CPU utilization seems to be in the JDBC driver when the database doesn't respond in a timely fashion. I don't know what causes it, but it happens when I am working with a complicated dataset. It isn't even that the memory usage is too high and the server is thrashing, the CPU just goes to max and starts refusing connections. The only solution to this is to kill and restart the JRun instance. After that it behaves well again until it crashes.

In all fariness to Java / J2EE, I have only experienced these issues while working with ColdFusion Enterprise on Windows based systems, this doesn't seem to happen on Linux, at least in my experience. Since MySpace was so heavily invested in both ColdFusion and Windows hardware, I guess they had no choice but to use New Atlanta's Blue Dragon. Still, what most programmers have to realize is that at the end of the day, it is the tool that delivers the best that will be used. No matter what we feel about Microsoft, ASP.net is fast and stable in it's newest iteration. One of the advantages to ASP.net is that it automatically fixes it's memory leaks. This is something that Macromedia desperately needs to build into JRun. ColdFusion is sometimes slow and is often buggy when dealing with some of it's advanced features. Experienced CF developers know how to deal with most of this so it doesn't come into play very often, and I'd bet that with higher quality Microsoft SQL Server JDBC drivers, and the application of good design patterns and reusable CFCs they could have gotten better results out of the CFMX server. But as the CEO of New Atlanta said in his blog, to rewrite all the code to take advantage of components, invocation, and var typed variables is beside the point. They made the decision that would best serve their business. If their code was reusable or not is immaterial after the fact.

Still, I find ColdFusion's performance to be reasonable. I wouldn't call JSP / ColdFusion a speed demon any day, with light load, PHP blows it away with 10 users on it, but once you scale that up to 100,000 users concurrently, then Java starts to shine. Since Microsoft shamelessly copied Java with C# and improved on it, it is no suprise that ASP.net performs as well as it does since it has native OS support in Windows Server. No one uses ColdFusion because it is the fastest from the execution standpoint, they use it because it is the fastest language to develop in.

Another interesting point would be if Microsoft were to acquire New Atlanta in order to integrate ColdFusion support directly into IIS. This would give Macromedia / Adobe some competition and force them to fix some of the issues they have let languish in CF. It wouldn't be too suprising a move since they are seriously evaluating building PHP support directly into IIS. I'll bet that it wasn't even that tough for New Atlanta to port their J2EE version of ColdFusion over to ASP.net due to it's support for C# and Microsoft's Java source to C# source conversion tools. It, of course required some optimization, I'm sure, but I'll bet it is smokin'. Maybe I'll download it and try it.

New Atlanta
New Atlanta CEO's blog
House of Fusion MySpace Conversion Discussion


  • http://jakerocheleau.com/ Jake Rocheleau

    Interesting read. This is looking at their architecture just about 2 years ago, an interesting slot when compared with MySpace today.