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Privacy on the Internet

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: Companies, Sun Microsystems, Uncategorized | Tags: | No Comments »

Privacy on the Internet

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperPrivacy on the internet is a myth. If you want to keep your personal information, or public information like your address and phone number, then don't have anything to do with publishing on the web. It makes no sense that someone would post something on the internet and then think that it can remain either out of reach of the search engines, which most search engines do an incredible job of, or that your information can be kept from zealous searchers.

There have been a number of articles recently about people unhappy with facts about them being made public, or being publicized. I can only say that anyone who posts on the internet has only one single chance for anonymity, and that is that their site gets drowned out among the noise. If a web publisher's site becomes even marginally popular, they are open for scrutiny and their information is fair game. All web publishers take this risk, especially in the age of search engines where your posts are indexed as soon as you write them. All it takes is one backlink, and sometimes not even that. With domains, everyone knows that your information is not private when you register a domain. That is why you should provide a bogus phone number, and a valid email address. You should get yourself a P.O. box to list on your registration so that junk mail doesn't come to your house. You have to do these things if you don't want to be bothered.

What is interesting about all this is that people never seem to mind when someone figures out where a celibrity lives and thousands of fans, crazies, and journalists descend like vultures to surround their house and take naked and unflattering pictures of them. People seem to figure that they have somehow asked for it by being famous. Well guess what everyone, anyone who publishes anything on the internet takes the risk of being famous. And while this is really cool for many things, it is definately uncool for others. Perhaps people should think about that the next time they read some sensationalist article about a superstar, or look at topless pictures of an actress sunbathing on the internet. They should think about how it would feel if it were them. Perhaps they would have more compassion, perhaps not if they are exhibitionists, but they should at least think about it. Personally I don't really feel bad for the guy, the one with the foetry.com domain. He is probably making a small fortune off advertising on his site, everytime CNET or any of the other media outlets link to him. His PR is probably 6 or better by now. He should enjoy his 15 minutes of fame. That's all most of us get.