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Safari and Standards Complicance

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: JavaScript, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Safari and Standards Compliance

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperApple with Safari 2.0 has taken a major step toward standards compliance and largely are taking a leadership role in this area with its outstanding support for the Java runtime. I have heard some griping about Apple using KHTML, the default rendering technology behind the Konqueror browser for KDE, for a base, then running away with the open source once they have figured it out and not giving it back to the OSS community.

While I am extremely happy that Apple has made their browser Acid2 compliant, and they may have one of the fastest CSS rendering engines around built into the AppleWebCore. It is pretty upsetting that they would not share these advances with the developers working on KHTML so that it could also pass the Acid2 test. I can understand that some things you want to keep close to your vest for security reasons, but I can hardly believe that changes you have made to the way pages render in a browser could compromise your system integrity. This appears to be a situation in which Apple wants to be the most standards compliant platform on the market. This would be fantastic from a business standpoint since many in the scientific and mathematics communities would probably prefer to use technology that adhered to standards so as to better communicate information between offices, regions, and countries. I can understand that Apple wants to distinguish its platform from others, and I love the fact they are using standards compliance to do this, however I feel that it is to break the spirit of open source / corporate collaboration not to give something back to the KHTML community.

Speaking of Safari, I noticed a bug recently while writing some javascript for it. I have a javascript that sets the tabindex for a number of input fields, and it works properly, however in Safari it persists in scrolling the real browser scrollbar instead of the div, overflow:auto, element's scrollbar. I had noticed this way back in Safari 1.2 where if you put a flash item within a scrollable div, it would take the flash element and while scrolling lay it on top of all your other content, even if it was above or below the div. All other browsers, even IE 6, handle this properly, scrolling the div with the tabbing. This is a pretty big bug if they want to promote standards compliant web development and accessability. I'd like to see this fixed in Mac OS X 10.4.1, but after browsing the message boards elsewhere, I'd say they already have their hands full, so I am not supremely hopeful.

Microsoft is promising that its IE7 browser will be standards compliant, but just how standards compliant is really the question. I think that Microsoft has learned the error of its proprietary ways. Sure it will continue to bundle its software with everything anyone buys from them, but I don't think they will continue to cripple other products to make theirs look better. They seem to have given up on their own version of DHTML and are happy with XHTML. I noticed that their primary page even validates now. I think that it makes sense for Microsoft to go the standards route also, and with no shortage of developer feedback, they have almost no excuse not to.