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What Does a Sun Bankruptcy do to Enterprise?

Posted: December 29th, 2008 | Author: | Filed under: Companies, java, Programming, Sun Microsystems, Uncategorized | Tags: , | No Comments »

What Does a Sun Bankruptcy do to Enterprise?

Picture of IrvinFor more than a few weeks now, I have been pondering some broad implications of companies that we all rely upon failing. Probably the grand-daddy of these is Sun Microsystems.

Normally I wouldn’t be concerned about tech companies going away. It is part of the normal advancement of the art, but in Sun’s case, it does concern me. While I don’t share many developers’ blind love of Java, or Solaris, or any product really. I do feel that Sun has given a tremendous amount to the software engineering community and would be sorely missed if they were to go belly up. At the time of my writing this, Sun’s stock is at $3.41 per share, and their market capitalization is 2.52 Billion, less than Sun has on hand in cash.

I don’t necessarily think that Sun is in financial trouble, but it does seem that there are a bunch of products that they release that are mostly not for pay. Not to mention that their financial performance may / should, be giving some corporate IT departments pause as to their dependence on their technologies. Many companies rely on support from Sun, and if that were to transition to the community, the level of response may not be sufficient. The question I would ask is, “Will a Sun Bankruptcy Drive Corporations Back to Microsoft?”

Unfortunately, I can’t see any other alternative at the moment. There are millions of lines of code out there written against the Sun JVM, and while the JVM is now mostly open source, and so is Solaris, the companies that count on those lines of code typically are not interested in maintaining that code as well. Without Sun, you could have JVM forking, Solaris forking, etc… where a particular application written against Java or Solaris may not run in a given company. Corporations would have none of these problems if they used the .net stack for application development.

Now, I am not advocating that all corporations out there should drop their Sun implementations and run to Microsoft, but what I am saying is that they should prepare themselves for a little instability. I tend to use Ruby and the Rails framework for most everything anymore, but I have come to be somewhat skeptical of the gems that I am using. I am also aware that there is currently no support beyond community support for most of these items, and the developers working on them could get bored and go away. So for functionality that is more than a nice-to-have, I tend to write it myself.

Hopefully this will go away when we start to see professional gem houses, but in the near term, I would hope that companies would begin to diversify their stack a bit so as to mitigate the cost, such as re-engineering their non-core systems to be less dependent on core software from a particular vendor. The last thing you would want would be to find a showstopper bug in something you were about to release that was based on a technology from a shaky vendor, that holds up your business process.

Most good IT shops already support a variety of technologies so as to not be locked in to any one particular implementation from any given vendor, but enterprise developers should not continue to believe that Sun or Java will be around forever in its current enterprise-blessed, no-brainer form. I think serious unbiased evaluation of technologies to be included in future products should gradually become the norm. If Microsoft wins, so-be it, there is some good stuff in .net, but I would hope that Ruby and PHP would benefit from this situation.