Today is a good day to code

Why My Faith in HTML5 Has Been Reinstated ( Or How I Learned *again* to Love JavaScript )

Posted: July 13th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: CSS, JavaScript, Programming | Tags: , , | 1 Comment »

Over the long weekend, I was lamenting over how many times I had to write the same routines in different languages… Objective-C, Java, PHP, etc… I realized that I have, and would have wasted tons of time writing native code, and how, really most of the functionality of the application can be handled with various features of HTML 5.  Originally I had been against this, but now that the iPhone has finally caught up and has a reasonable processor, I think that the HTML5 experience can be nearly as good as native.

The funny thing is that much of what is driving my decision is the desire to have my applications have data and interfaces that are available everywhere, mobile, web, desktop, etc… aka, the original promise of the web.  Using local caching, the JavaScript key/value store, and the database will help to allow me to provide a compelling disconnected use experience.  The code that I write will be useful across all of the platforms that I use.  The one caveat that I am making is that I need to focus on one browser, or approach, and for that WebKit based browsers seem to be the logical choice.

Now I realize that not all of my application concepts will be possible with HTML5 and JavaScript, however this recent thought experiment I realized that most of the features that I would have normally insisted needed to be done natively can be done with HTML5.  The biggest issue that I have run across is the 5 MB limit on database sizes in Mobile Safari.  I know it was there in iOS 3.x, I don’t think they have lifted this in the current OS.  The other issue is the forced UTF-16 encoding of characters.  While I understand this technically, it makes it difficult to store data larger than 2.5 MB on a device in the SQLite storage available to JavaScript.  The approach taken in desktop Safari, where you can ask the user to increase the available size if your database creation fails is a much better approach.

Another interesting pattern that I see emerging is that of utilizing HTML5 as the UI tier, and establishing the business logic and control structure behind a HTTP server that would expose additional native functionality to the HTML5 app.  The benefit here is that your local server implementation could match the remote server implementation, such that your client APIs could remain consistent.  This seems to me to be the best architecture for minimizing the work involved with porting solutions across platforms.  I absolutely love Cocoa and Objective-C, I enjoy the concepts behind the Android APIs, while despising Java’s syntax, and I think that .net is pretty cool as well, however when it comes to getting applications deployed to the maximum number of users in the leanest manner possible, I think it makes sense to leverage the web heavily up front, and then backfill the native implementations as necessary.


  • http://www.csextrem.ro Extrem

    The best of html is html5