Today is a good day to code

Google Sitemaps

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: ColdFusion, Google, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Google Sitemaps

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperAnother couple of projects I started working on was getting a properly configured robots.txt, going, and to use Google sitemaps. If you have a gmail account, and you are a publisher, this is a very easy way to make sure Google crawls your site properly, and knows about all your links. One of the things I have noticed about the googlebot is that it frequently hits my homepage, but it would always only index the blogs that were directly linked to from that page. It would almost never go all the way through my site to get to the oldest articles.

Here is the code from the component that I am using to generate the sitemaps file. I modified the code originally avaliable at ColdFusion based Google Sitemap Creator. It is a .cfc so it should be pretty plug and play. Of course I will change the sensitive details about my site…








http://www.owensperformance.com/index.cfm
#theDatetime#
always 1.0


http://www.owensperformance.com/resume.cfm
#theDatetime#
monthly 0.9


http://www.owensperformance.com/aboutus.cfm
#theDatetime#
monthly 0.3


http://www.owensperformance.com/blog.cfm
#theDatetime#
daily 0.8






http://www.owensperformance.com/blog_content.cfm?
articleid=#urlString.articleid#

#theDatetime#
never 0.7





file=”#ExpandPath('../sitemap.xml')#”
output=”#theXml#” nameconflict=”overwrite”>
Google Sitemaps Overview


Dirty Tricks in Web Advertising

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: JavaScript, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Dirty Tricks in Web Advertising

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperContrary to what most people believe, web advertising is in its infancy. Many companies are still trying to figure out what works, and what doesn't. Their experiments are understandable, they are trying to figure out an audience that spans all known geographic, ethnic, social, economic, racial, religious, ideological, and moral boundaries, phew! That was a mouthful. There are still even newer marketing demographics and sub-demographics being created while they are trying to figure out how to target the old ones. How on Earth is a marketing / web development studio supposed to get a grip on all of it. The answer is elusive, but first I will say what won't get the job done, then we'll explore some ways to get it done.

The way advertisers won't get a grip on web niches is by utilizing dirty tricks in advertising. This includes, but is not limited to, pop-ups, pop-unders, javascript pop-ups, unwanted javascript redirections, flash pop-ups, spam email, and tacky, poorly designed banner ads. Let's look at these one at a time. There has never been a time in the history of the internet where unsolicited pop-up advertisements have been a good thing. As indicated above, this was forgivable because the internet was new, and this was a new way to reach people. Once, however, people began to hate this method of advertising, and demonstrate it by installing software to prevent pop-ups it should have stopped, right. Wrong, instead web marketers began to circuimvent users' defences and use pop-under ads, or advertisements that would come up and hide behind your top browser window, waiting until you closed your browser. Great idea right?!!? Wrong, that is like letting that one advertising exec with the awful ideas in the office get a shot at a limted run of ads. For example, he comes up with A new cola bottle with an overweight child pouring a bag of sugar with the cola label into his mouth, with a moniker reading cola making a big America even bigger. This runs in limited fashion despite the passionate pleas of every focus group it is exposed to. Cola sees a radical drop in its sales numbers, but instead promotes this guy to creative director, thereby putting the ads on billboard all over the country. Eventually Cola goes out of business, a smouldering ruin of its former greatness.

That should never happen in real life. That is the absurdity of trying to irritate users into adopting your product, it just doesn't make sense, and will end up making a company bankrupt. But it didn't stop there, the anti-pop up software got smarter, and was better able to block pop-under, and javascript pop-up windows. Now, there are always going to be an element of shadyness associated with some companies. That is as true in reality as it is on the web, hence unwanted redirections. But there were and are legitimate companies that have used, and are still using these tactics. Surely by now these companies have gotten the message that users don't want a bunch of pop-ups littering their desktops; and they have. The problem now is that in an effort to be less invasive, they have adopted CSS and Flash pop-ups. Talk about dense! People don't want to wait to get to their content. These are barriers, just like splash pages. People will click away.

Spam email is probably the most reviled thing the internet has ever produced, however companies continue to do it, and they put their (click here to remove yourelf from our list) in like 6pt. font at the bottom of their email surrounded by disclaimer information. Most users at this point aren't even looking at the garbage that comes across in their email. They either delete it immediately, or they look at the ad, remember the vendor so that they can never ever buy anything from them again.

Tacky banner ads are the least of the evils described in this article, but they can be just as distracting as pop-ups. Flashing, excessively moving or audible banner ads are no-nos. If you want people to be able to view your website at work without their bosses going nuts, you should make it look professional so that it blends in with the rest of their applications. Not draw attention to it so that they get a repromand for spending too much time on the net.

So, now that we have explored how not to advertise on the net, let's see how to advertise. When I go to Froogle


Whirlwinds of Code and Forming Design Patterns

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: ColdFusion, Microsoft, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Whirlwinds of Code and Forming Design Patterns

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperOne of the biggest issues with understanding object oriented programming is getting over its associated terminology. Most developers whether they realize it or not have formed design patterns, and use them all the time. If an established developer were to look at their code, they would often see that their application was broken down into data access and storage components, display components, and the logic that allows them to successfully communicate. When asked to bring a system from one application to another, they can usually do it with little to no modification. This is the idea behind design patterns.

In an interview yesterday I realized that I had better take a more aggressive look at design patterns. Understanding the terminology may be tough, but it is an excellent way to communicate an application's business needs, especially using UML, as well as getting down to the lowest level of describing the objects that will comprise your frameworks. I have always tried to get a firm handle on design patterns, but they have largely eluded me. I have understood simple systems like breaking your code into well defined model-view-controller layers, and using messaging to communicate between layers, but I have never really been able to understand the more advanced concepts. In the interview I noticed that I was designing with some object oriented concepts by using Fusebox, even if I didn't know what to call them, but ignoring some of the more specific ones.

Programming is often like the game Dark Cloud for the PlayStation 2. For those who haven't played the game, it is a role playing game in which the player travels around their world trying to re-assemble their world, which was scattered by an evil genie. The player is provided a weapon which is pretty weak to start with, and by travelling around the world, they can gain objects which make their weapon stronger. When they get enough objects, they can merge their objects permanently into the weapon, increasing its effectiveness. They then begin the process anew, adding objects to the newly enhanced weapon until they can merge it again. When you have better weaponry, the player can gain pieces of their world more quickly and can assemble more complex worlds in shorter time. It is like this with programming. Often I feel as though code is whirling around me and once I have that “aha!” moment it merges and becomes something solid for me that enables me to take the next step. Building large applications has caused me to develop different frameworks or APIs for me to use. For example, most of my applications require search, so I have developed a pretty thorough search framework, made up of components, that can be moved with little modification. I wouldn't have known that it was that, but it is.

Today, or last night rather, I had one of those “aha!” moments, the moments we all write software for. I was finally able to put names to some of what I was doing. Now that I am beginning to understand, I can see why it would be hard for experienced object oriented developers to explain to procedural developers how to do OO design. You just begin to think differently. I can see about ten areas in which I can improve my search API / framework to make it more portable. The hardest part is finding the dragon, slaying it is easy. In other words, associating design patterns to what you are doing is hard, once you can put names to faces so to speak, the rest is simple. For a while I could never understand why people were so excited about Microsoft enabling the use of C# in SQL Server 2005. But now I can see, you can create an entire data access framework all on the database server, abstracting the underlying database and its queries from the application. It would be possible, in a web application, to completely separate the model from the controller and view layers. This has huge benefits in code maintenance because you could have any number of applications using the data access framework through web services.

What really dragged it together for me was why Java was so tough. I realized that it was tough because my mostly procedural mind was trying to write a program thinking about what each class should do instead of things like what does this class know about itself, what is it's purpose. How do the methods inside it work to help it achieve its purpose. In short I was trying to write a simple program, instead of thinking about a toolset to help me achieve my goal. With Java, you have to diagram, you have to chart or you will just get lost. Even objective-c makes more sense, with over-riding the init method for objects. These things didn't make sense before, but now I am getting it. I still have a long way to go, but I think I'll start working with Mach II, even if there is a performance hit. That is a little more OO than Fusebox, but Fusebox is a great foundation for it.

All that being said, there are still some instances where you can go too far with data encapsulization. For example if you had a table that had contact information in it. You wouldn't want to return each row, create a struct out of it, then set an iterator method to go through each struct, then each element of the structs, at least not in ColdFusion. Iterating over a query is something that the built-in elements of ColdFusion do fairly well anyway so building frameworks to disassemble a query object, then re-assemble it as a bunch of structs is probably an un-necessary layer of complexity for most applications. So like anything else, discretion is required. Now I'm ready to tackle the UML book and hopefully figure out how to use that nifty ID3 tag reader framework for Objective-C that I downloaded a while back and couldn't quite figure out how to use. I've got Macintosh applications that need to be developed.

Here are a few of the sites that helped me get to the “aha!” moment.
Macromedia exerpt from 'Design Patterns'
ColdFusion object factories, the Composition CFC
Introduction to the Mach-II framework


Safari and Standards Complicance

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: JavaScript, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Safari and Standards Compliance

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperApple with Safari 2.0 has taken a major step toward standards compliance and largely are taking a leadership role in this area with its outstanding support for the Java runtime. I have heard some griping about Apple using KHTML, the default rendering technology behind the Konqueror browser for KDE, for a base, then running away with the open source once they have figured it out and not giving it back to the OSS community.

While I am extremely happy that Apple has made their browser Acid2 compliant, and they may have one of the fastest CSS rendering engines around built into the AppleWebCore. It is pretty upsetting that they would not share these advances with the developers working on KHTML so that it could also pass the Acid2 test. I can understand that some things you want to keep close to your vest for security reasons, but I can hardly believe that changes you have made to the way pages render in a browser could compromise your system integrity. This appears to be a situation in which Apple wants to be the most standards compliant platform on the market. This would be fantastic from a business standpoint since many in the scientific and mathematics communities would probably prefer to use technology that adhered to standards so as to better communicate information between offices, regions, and countries. I can understand that Apple wants to distinguish its platform from others, and I love the fact they are using standards compliance to do this, however I feel that it is to break the spirit of open source / corporate collaboration not to give something back to the KHTML community.

Speaking of Safari, I noticed a bug recently while writing some javascript for it. I have a javascript that sets the tabindex for a number of input fields, and it works properly, however in Safari it persists in scrolling the real browser scrollbar instead of the div, overflow:auto, element's scrollbar. I had noticed this way back in Safari 1.2 where if you put a flash item within a scrollable div, it would take the flash element and while scrolling lay it on top of all your other content, even if it was above or below the div. All other browsers, even IE 6, handle this properly, scrolling the div with the tabbing. This is a pretty big bug if they want to promote standards compliant web development and accessability. I'd like to see this fixed in Mac OS X 10.4.1, but after browsing the message boards elsewhere, I'd say they already have their hands full, so I am not supremely hopeful.

Microsoft is promising that its IE7 browser will be standards compliant, but just how standards compliant is really the question. I think that Microsoft has learned the error of its proprietary ways. Sure it will continue to bundle its software with everything anyone buys from them, but I don't think they will continue to cripple other products to make theirs look better. They seem to have given up on their own version of DHTML and are happy with XHTML. I noticed that their primary page even validates now. I think that it makes sense for Microsoft to go the standards route also, and with no shortage of developer feedback, they have almost no excuse not to.


ColdFusion MX 7 Licensing Issues

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: ColdFusion, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , | 2 Comments »

ColdFusion MX 7 Licensing Issues

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperI have been wrestling with an issue that should not be an issue that anyone should have to deal with. The licensing issues around a piece of software. The piece of software happens to be ColdFusion MX 7. The issue is that I am running it on OS X Server on a brand spanking new Xserve. I have everything installed properly, all my applications are working, and the server is operating beautifully. It should be nothing to plug in the serial number to put the finishing touches on it right? Wrong.

I have my client purchase a standard license for the “other” installation of ColdFusion, and the Mac OS X version of JRun. He proceeds to do so and sends me the serial numbers for both. I am excited because I'll finally be done with setting the server up and can get back to developing applications. I bring up the JRun administrator, put in the serial number with no problem. JRun says fully licensed 2-cpu version. I am very happy as I bring up the ColdFusion administrator to put this baby to bed. Once I bring up the admin, and get to the system information screen where I can enter the serial number I enter the number with no hesitation. The server responds that it is not accepted. Taken aback I check the number twice and have the purchasing agent fax over the list of numbers. No, the number is right. I go on a long excursion of un-installing ColdFusion, re-installing ColdFusion. Trying to put in the serial number at the beginning of the installation. That doesn't even work, it says that I already have a version installed, even when I don't. I know because I formatted my computer to make sure every vestige of ColdFusion was gone. I even installed it onto my PC putting in the standard serial number to see it work just fine. Neither myself, or the purchaser saw that to run the J2EE version of ColdFusion you must purchase the “Enterprise” license.

Let me say that again clearly so that anyone else running into this issue can find this on the web and save their time.

ColdFusion can not be installed in standard mode ever using the J2EE / “other” version.

This was bizarre to me, not because we both missed it, but instead because during the purchasing process a warning didn't come up letting him know that we couldn't use the “other” installation with the “standard” license. I know that running ColdFusion on Mac OS X Server is not supported, but they could at least let users run ColdFusion standard if they want to. When I got them on support I indicated that it appeared to be a nickel-and-dime, bait-and-switch sales operation. Buy this and then if you want it to really work, you have to buy this.

My feelings regarding this are like one would feel to a significant other who had wronged them in some way. On one hand you still love them and couldn't think of a world without them, but on the other, you wish they would go away forever. This isn't the first time I have felt that way about Macromedia. So, here is a situation where I will probably have to re-write my applications in either PHP or JSP. Macromedia, since we have bought JRun, doesn't seem interested in swapping out our standard and JRun enterprise licenses for a single ColdFusion enterprise license with the JRun license. It would be fair for us to have to throw in an extra $1,000, but another $3,000. As sweet as ColdFusion is, I'm not sure it is worth the cost. I've never had to buy it before, and I don't think I would.


Internet Explorer 7 Won’t Make the Grade on Acid

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: JavaScript, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Internet Explorer 7 Won't Make the Grade on Acid

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperAs the market leader and pace-setter as far as which technologies make the cut for the web Microsoft has a responsiblity to create the most standards compliant browser possible, even at the risk of breaking legacy sites built specifically for IE. Microsoft has always wanted developers to use it's unusual flavor of IE. Whether it is by building extra padding into block level elements regardless of how the css padding attribute is used, or allowing oddities like allowing the use of the color attribute on TR table elements, developers have always had to consider the quirks of IE when building anything for deployment over the web.

I'm sure that IE 7 will be much improved over IE 6 as far as standards compliance is concerned, and some of those oddities I truly enjoy, like being able to give a TR an ID attribute and specifying a header style for my tables in a stylesheet, but at the same time, if we don't have web standards we'll devolve into fragmented development languages like it was 1995 all over again. IE 6 actually had excellent standards compliance when it came out, but times have changed and there are some advanced features like page-break-after that I'd love to use more widely. Part of the reason I love to build intranet applications for Mac only shops is that I know they will be using Safari 2.0 which is an excellent browser based on the open source Konqueror browser bundled with many Linux distros. It supports most if not all CSS 2 tags, and should pass the Acid2 test with ease. Also, by developing to XHTML 1.0 Strict I know that my site will degrade gracefully on everything from mobile devices to old 3.0 browsers. Using ECMAScript also keeps most backward compatability and allows developers to create reliable JavaScripts that will work across all compliant browsers in the same fashion.

I agree with Hakon Lie that Microsoft should really take more time and make sure they nail this one, not just for right now, but for the future since we all know they won't release another web browser perhaps forever since they are convinced that Avalon will change the face of web applications and render the web browser superfluous. We've heard that one before, remember Active X? I hope that everyone calls on Microsoft to work to get IE 7 to pass the Acid2 test, not just so that it will support some bizarre standard that is going to make all our lives harder, but so that developers can be sure that applications they develop today will still look and work the same five years from now. C'mon Microsoft please?

Next Explorer to fail Acid Test – CNET


Macromedia or Adobe Studio 8

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: ColdFusion, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , | No Comments »

Macromedia or Adobe Studio 8

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperToday I started looking at Studio 8, and of course I am impressed by Flash 8. But I'm really drooling over Dreamweaver 8, which of course will get more use. I like the new video features of Flash 8 and the performance increase is definately welcome, but for all intents and purposes Flash MX is still great. But as always the brilliant marketing folks at Macromedia have priced the upgrade aggressively to move the entire suite. What is interesting to me is that they are still bundling flash paper. I would have thought it would be pulled in favor of the soon-to-be-included Adobe Acrobat. I guess the ink hasn't dried on the agreement yet.

Some of the things Macromedia is promising in Dreamweaver 8 that look good to me are, Section 508 compliance and complex CSS rendering. As well as XML / XSLT reference materials. The reference section has been by far the biggest thing to keep me using Dreamweaver over using other tools. The visual XML editor should be cool too. I'll probably pre-order the suite. I'm looking forward to using Fireworks as I have always preferred it to using Photoshop. Before I get flamed, let me remind you all that I am a developer first, and a designer second. Plus I got the Suite MX before I got Photoshop CS so that is my tool of choice. I can't wait to see what some of the designers are going to do with Flash 8.

My only long lasting gripe that has almost led me to create my own WYSIWYG editor several times is that the FTP process in Dreamweaver is awful. It doesn't make sense that this is not spun off onto it's own thread running separately from the application with a lock on the file that is currently in process. Why this wasn't done in Suite 2004, I'll never understand. It makes me use my favorite FTP tool Transmit instead of the one built into Dreamweaver, which is somewhat inconvenient.

Of course the RDS stuff for databases and the CFC components panel is nice, but it would be great to see some real commitment to ColdFusion with a CFC browser like the one that is built into the Administrator working through the RDS connection. Also, while I'm at it, it would be cool to have the CF validation tool in Dreamweaver to quickly validate CF templates against different versions of ColdFusion. Especially for those of us who got our CF legs in MX, but who sometimes have to work in 5, yuk!


Configuring ColdFusion MX 7 and Apache

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: JavaScript, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Configuring ColdFusion MX 7 and Apache

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperAnother issue I kept coming across during my configuration of the XServe G5's Apache and JRun4 was that the virtual hosts didn't seem to be resolving. The same site appeared to collect all the hits. After several hours last night troubleshooting, I finally found the culprit.

When the JRun / Apache bridge is configured, a small module is built and plugged into Apache that allows it to process ColdFusion templates from within its default web root. This functionality is great, it allows a user to serve up .jsp, .php, and .cfm files from the same folder. A single modification is needed to JRun to allow web users to get to your files without having to add /cfusion to the end of their URL request. In JRun there is a setting under the “Application Server” > “Summary,” you will see a section titled Web Applications. Under this header there will be two apps if you have JRun and ColdFusion set up correctly. They will read “CFMX RDS Application” which we are not going to do anything to, and “Macromedia Coldfusion MX,” which we are going to change. If you click on the name of the application “Macromedia Coldfusion MX,” you will see a simple screen that will show you the current context path for the application, which should be “/cfusion” or something similar. If you change it to “/” then your templates will run from the root domain.

With this process, however there are a couple of caveats. You may have to copy all of the coldfusion JavaScript files to a cfusion subdirectory in your applications folder, if you are using ColdFusion forms validation. Also, the images for the administrator will nont appear when you work with the administrator. Accessing the administrator is not quite as straightforward as you might expect, also. A minor change is needed, it obviously no longer needs the “/cfusion/CFIDE/Administrator/index.cfm,” instead it now will use “/cfide/Administrator/index.cfm.” Make sure to make the “cfide” lowercase or it will not work.

Once you have this working, if you already have applications loaded into the “JRun4/servers/cfusion” directory, and they happen to have the same folder name as the ones in your Apache web root folder, then when you call your templates, the server will not know which ones to pick which will have the effect of causing long nights of hair pulling to figure out why your file changes have no effect on the operation of the server. The resolution is simple, do not use the servers directory of JRun to execute your web applications, instead use the Apache web root. You will have to delete any common files between the appliation in your folder within the JRun servers folder, and the Apache web root. Basically just delete your web application from the JRun application folder, and have it only located in Apache's web root, if you haven't already gotten that.

My issue was that both files had the same index.cfm file, and what was happening was that the virtual root was resolving properly, but a cflocation tag that I had in the index.cfm contained within my JRun servers directory was being chosen over the same file in my Apache web root. Once I deleted the version of the application in the JRun folder, the issue disappeared, the server was behaving correctly.

The moral of the story, don't leave superfluous files around your server, they will always come back to haunt you in the end.


The Future of Scripting

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: ColdFusion, Companies, Microsoft, Programming, Sun Microsystems, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment »

The Future of Scripting

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperInitially I wanted to stay away from scripting languages as a developer due to the fact that they weren't really programming languages at all. For some time I was reluctant to even call myself a programmer until I built my first Java desktop application. In CNET's open source blog today, they ask the question has scripting peaked?

Scripting hasn't peaked out yet. The reason is clear. Building a web site with C++ or Java is like driving an armored tank to your mailbox. It is that ridiculous. The funny thing is that even Microsoft realizes this, giving their ASP.net developers two languages to choose from when developing web applications. There are many reasons for enterprises to choose C# over Visual Basic when building a web application, especially if they already have desktop and client-server applications built using the technology. It would be possible to completely reuse many of the methods used in the desktop application for the web application. The frameworks built into J2EE as well as C# allow for robust development making it less likely that a developer will lose control of their code. Still, using these technologies and frameworks where a scripting language and a light framework would do adds un-necessary overhead to a project and can push deadlines out unreasonably.

Here's what I see. PHP is a fantastic scripting language that has no real back end and therefore is suitable for light to moderate customer facing websites and some intranet applications. Use of PHP in this regard will only continue to grow. I think some of the 25% decline in worldwide use is a reactive measure to PHP's early security vulnerability. PHP is losing ground quickly to ASP.net and VB scripting as Microsoft's Server 2003 is more widely adopted. Personally I think that LAMP is superior for many tasks, but ASP.net is almost ubiquitous now, hosting and maintenance are cheap. I'll continue to use PHP for light jobs, but at the same time I realize that this is just a preference and performance-wise ASP.net is better. Talking about Java… Sun needs to buy ColdFusion from Macromedia / Adobe. It should be THE Java application server. There is no cleaner and easier scripting language, and it has nearly unlimited flexibility and is design-pattern friendly. Why this move hasn't occured yet is beyond me. It would have made sense for Macromedia to sell it, but I think the issue is that Sun has many proud engineers who love to over develop products. The thought of supporting something as business friendly as ColdFusion probably makes them sick. The business case for this is probably that Macromedia probably sees the big picture and that there are big bucks in ColdFusion, especially now that enterprises are seeing it as a way to get around JSP's notoriously long development cycles.

I see scripting as having a bright future, and I'll tend to side with Zend's guys as saying that regardless of how the Evans study got its numbers, PHP is increasing in use not decreasing. I'm not sure if it is true, but if the next version of IIS is going to have PHP support built-in, I'll be seriously considering going with a Microsoft server in the near future and running it alongside ColdFusion. I like PHP, but I just like ColdFusion better.

news.com – Scripting's demise


What is this Y!Q stuff?

Posted: December 31st, 1969 | Author: | Filed under: JavaScript, Programming, Uncategorized | Tags: , , | No Comments »

What is this Y!Q stuff?

Picture of Irv Owens Web DeveloperYou may have noticed all of the Y!Q links everywhere on my site. It is a new beta product from Yahoo! that allows people to perform web searches constrained by selected content from the page they are searching from. The content that goes to Yahoo! is selected by the publisher and targeted to return even more relevant results than would be possible going directly to the search engine.

When a user visits a search engine, the system has no background about the person to constrain their results so it makes it difficult to perform a search, for example if I knew someone were from Washington State, and they typed in the word apple, then I could assume they might be looking for apple wholesalers, or apple growers, or apple trees. If someone from California searched for the word apple, I might return the company. This is possible if you know something about the person who is searching, which is why personalized search has been receiving more focus of late.

I prefer the context based approach, because then I don't have to provide any personal information for the search engine to give me what I want. It would know just by the content of the web page that I am searching from.

I'll be honing the coldfusion parsing scripts to give the best possible content to Yahoo! I'll be removing words that are less than four characters in length from the article, to get rid of parts of words and words that carry little meaning like 'the.' I hope to have the best, most relevant results, because Yahoo! is offering $5,000 in their contest. Of course there had to be some motive for me to use this beta program!

I suppose that in its final iteration, Yahoo! will create some type of advertising revenue sharing model similar to Google's adwords. They seem to be hoping that it will generate more clicks because of its usefulness to the user. It is still kind of buggy, for example in all browsers other than Safari 2.0 a semi-transparent overlay pops up when the Y!Q link is pressed, on Safari, it takes you to Yahoo's relevant results page. Hopefully they will fix this soon, I'm pretty sure it has something to do with the changes Apple made to Safari's javascript processing engine. Also, since I am trying to automate this, sometimes a character gets into the string, and causes the Y!Q to return something not valid. I hope this will help with your searching.