Today is a good day to code

Project Fi

Posted: November 27th, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: android, AT&T, Companies, Google, Tech Help | Tags: , , , , , | No Comments »

project-fi-logo

I found out about Project Fi early on, when a few of the blogs began talking about it.  At the time I was skeptical not about Google’s ability to pull the project off, but more about whether people would be able to accept routing their voice calls and SMS through Google’s data centers.  A couple of weeks ago, I did a ton of reading on Fi and decided based on what I had read to go ahead and sign up for the beta. It took a couple of weeks to get my invite, and even then it took me a few days to think through what it would mean to be a Fi customer.

My thought process went through three distinct gating concerns.  The first was whether I felt that my calls, SMS, and network traffic would be safe being piped via VPN from anonymous access points through Google’s data centers and to their ultimate destination.  If I could get through the first gate, I felt that it was time to think through the second.

The next gating concern for me was if there was enough value over T-Mobile for me to make the jump.  I was already frustrated with T-Mobile’s default opt-in “binge on” promotion, so I felt it was a good time to move.  My experience with T-Mobile for the past two years has been nothing but good, and I’m going to keep the rest of my family lines with them, but I use very little data so I figured that I could save a good amount of money by using Project Fi, and I haven’t been wrong.

fi-on-phone

The final gating factor was whether Google’s customer service would be adequate for my needs.  On this I had some of my largest concerns.  Google isn’t known for their legendary service and while I don’t typically need a lot of help, with wireless service, you never know.  On this front, I haven’t had to use their service yet, so the jury is still out.  Their self-help has been excellent so I decided to give it a shot.

I was able to get over the first hurdle, surprisingly easily.  I do not believe it is in Google’s interest to do anything untoward with their users’ data as it would destroy their business, so I’m actually not that worried about Google doing anything nefarious with my calls or texts ( if they can even access them ).  As far as turning my data over to the government, that wasn’t really a worry as T-Mobile, Sprint, AT&T, and Verizon will all turn over the same data on demand, so that was a push even if Google cooperates.  Finally, VPN technology has been around for quite a while, and it is well regarded as secure.  So going through a VPN to Google’s data center is much safer as far as I’m concerned than going through some coffee shop network, or Comcast back end.  In addition, the quality of service over Wi-Fi would probably exceed most of the spotty coverage I’ve had in some areas with T-Mobile so … gate opened…

Projectfi-account-home

After looking through my records for the past few months, I found that I typically use far less than 3 GB of data per month since I am typically in solid Wi-Fi coverage.  I was a little worried about how many hotspots there were around me in general and how well the Nexus 5x would traverse the networks, but this, so far, hasn’t been an issue, there are a number of affiliated Wi-Fi hotspots around the bay area, even more in San Francisco, so where I roam there are a number of options that will not cost my precious gigabytes.

I chose the 2 GB of data, bringing me to a total of $40 a month plus tax.  So far I have used .19 gigabytes and I’m about forty percent of the way through my plan period, so I’ll be getting a refund at the end.  This brings up one of the better things about Fi, which is that they will refund you for any data that you did not use.  They also will charge no overage for months in which you surpass your estimated limit.  That means that if I need to tether for work one month, I won’t be stuck paying extra during all of the other months.  On my line alone, after buying a Nexus 5x and selling my Galaxy S6 Edge, I was out about $45 up front, and I will save about $60 / month on my line alone.  So it is definitely a value for me, however YMMV as for some heavy mobile data users, Fi will end up costing you more.

Overall, I have been extremely happy with Fi and would heartily recommend it.  It has been stable and with great quality.  Using the Nexus 5x has been pretty good, the phone is laggy occasionally, however I think that is owing more to lacking a few optimizations than any inherent limitation in the hardware.  Other phones with the same specs running Android 5.x are smoother so I believe that things will get better on that front.  The Nexus 5x has had outstanding battery life for me on M and on Fi.  Granted I’m always in a good service area, and I am not a “heavy” user.  I tend to get around 48 hours of battery life from it.


Cupcake is on Again

Posted: May 22nd, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: android | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Yahoo!!!

OFFICIAL: CUPCAKE IS GO!!!


From the Horse’s Mouth: Cupcake 1.5 Coming Out for Android

Posted: May 6th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: android | Tags: , , , , | No Comments »

Finally T-Mobile, seriously:

http://forums.t-mobile.com/tmbl/board/message?board.id=Android_MR&thread.id=1


I Got The G1

Posted: February 16th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: android, Companies, Google, java, Programming | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Yesterday I got the T-Mobile G1. I’ll be putting it through its paces as I work to port Mides IDE to it. So far, so good, however ido have to say that I’m a little slower with the physical keyboard than I anticipated. I’ll be glad when the cupcake firmware comes out and I can use the virtual keyboard.

The apps so far are mostly good, the device is definitely quicker than the iPhone as far as raw hardware performance, but the navigation around the OS is a bit slower. Still, I’m excited to see what I can do with this SDK.

Overall I’d say that the philosophy of the device is different. The G1 and Android are definitely aiming to be a little computer in your pocket, while the iPhone is still an iPod first, which makes it more of an internet appliance than a computer. As such, it makes a direct comparison challenging at best.

The G1 is ugly, and Android is unpolished, but for a company that doesn’t make music players, it is pretty good. More importantly, it fits in better with my way of thinking, and I appreciate the freedom that Google and T-Mobile have given us. Hopefully it will continue to improve, but either way I am pretty happy with it. Hopefully Mides will turn out to be as good as it is in my head for the G1, and eventually the iPhone. Competition is a good thing.


Developing Mides for the G1

Posted: February 14th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: mides, Programming | Tags: , , , , | No Comments »

For the past few weeks I have been thinking about the limitations placed on my mobile ide Mides in the App store. I have been turning around and around the idea that I should write a version for Android that does some of the things that I really want for it to do, like have a real PHP parsing engine, have a ruby interpreter, etc…

I could put the time into doing it on the iPhone and then submit it to Apple to see what they say, but that could be a bunch of wasted effort, and even if they were to pass it one time, the next update may be rejected. My application is a niche application, so I am really not into it for the money, although it is nice. I think I could actually build a better version, a version that was more inline with what I had originally envisioned on Android.

I don’t think the G1 is better than the iPhone, or that the iPhone OS is inferior to Android in some way, it is just the policy of the AppStore keeps me afraid to try new things with my App, or that the effort could be wasted not because of a technical limitation, but because of a policy limitation, which I hate.

The biggest question now, since I have decided to port Mides to Android is whether to get a G1 developer unit or a straight up t-mobile G1. I think I’ll get the t-mobile unit since I am not rich, and since it is more inline with what my target audience is likely to use.

Boy, I’m not looking forward to having two phone bills, but I guess that is the cost of doing business.